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When digestive problems affect the quality of your life, it's time to get some help.

Our expert team is here to help diagnose and treat your gastrointestinal problems, and help you get back to good digestive health—and to enjoying your life.

Gastroenterology Care at Olathe Health

Our gastroenterologists detect and treat diseases of the digestive system, including the stomach, liver, intestines, esophagus, gall bladder, pancreas and other organs related to digestion.

Common digestive tract conditions include gas, bloating, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), acid reflux disease (GERD), ulcers, heartburn, celiac disease, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and colon cancer. When you find digestive problems affect the quality of your life, it’s time to get some help.

Additionally, our GI providers treat liver and fatty liver conditions, such as cirrhosis, hepatitis B and C, and others.

Our GI Endoscopy Procedures

  • Colonoscopy is a procedure that lets your doctor check the inside of your entire large intestine or colon. The procedure is done under light sedation using an endoscope which is inserted into the rectum and guided through the large intestines to look for abnormal growths (polyps), ulcers, tumors and areas of inflammation or bleeding. The doctor may use the endoscope to treat problems that are found or remove tissue polyps for further examination.

    NEW GUIDELINES!

    According to new 2018 guidelines set forth by the American Cancer Society, people who have an average risk of colorectal cancer should start regular screenings at age 45. Screenings should begin at a younger age because new cases of colorectal cancer are occurring at an increasing rate among younger adults.
  • An upper GI endoscopy or EGD (esophagogastroduodenoscopy) is a procedure to diagnose and treat problems in your upper gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, stomach and first part of the small intestine. The procedure is performed under light sedation, and involves the doctors inserting the endoscope into the patient’s mouth and throat. The endoscope does not interfere with your ability to breathe. During an EGD the doctor can stretch narrowed areas, remove polyps, remove swallowed objects and treat some causes of bleeding.

  • A capsule endoscopy is a test used to view your small intestine. The test involves swallowing a capsule the size of a large vitamin pill, which is equipped with a tiny camera that takes pictures while it passes through your digestive system. The pictures are transmitted to a small data recorder that you wear around your waist for about eight to 10 hours. The capsule will be passed naturally in your bowel movement. The doctor will review the data and photos from the “pillcam” and contact you with results.
  • CT scanning is a sophisticated form of an X-ray, which shows images of the internal structures of the body as image “slices,” which can provide the doctor with an excellent view of the liver, pancreas, spleen, and most portions of the digestive tract.
  • A sigmoidoscopy is a diagnostic test of the lower part of your colon or large intestine (the sigmoid colon). This part of your colon is close to your rectum and anus. Your doctor may order a sigmoidoscopy to can investigate causes of diarrhea, pain, constipation, polyps or bleeding. During the procedure, the doctor inserts the endoscope into the rectum. Small tools inserted through the scope allow the doctors to take tissue samples, remove polyps, or treat swollen veins in the rectum and anus (hemorrhoids).
  • ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography): ERCP is a procedure to diagnose and treat problems in the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, and pancreas. While the patient is sedated, the doctor will pass a thin, flexible endoscope through your mouth and down through the esophagus and stomach into the duodenum (first part of the small intestine). The doctor examines the organs with the camera, then injects a contrast material (dye) into the pancreatic or biliary ducts and takes X-rays. The doctor can also remove gallstones or take small samples of tissue for analysis during the procedure.
  • A liver biopsy is a test in which a tiny sample of your liver tissue is removed using a hollow needle inserted through the skin. The sample is sent to the lab for diagnosis

Locations

Our GI Imaging Tests

  • This is a group of X-rays taken of the upper part of the digestive system, including the esophagus, stomach and the first part of the small intestine. Some patients may be given barium to drink, which helps to show more detail of the GI tract on the X-rays. A special continuous X-ray, called a fluoroscope is often used so that motion within the GI tract can be seen in detail on a video monitor. This test is used to detect polyps, tumors, diverticulitis, gastroenteritis, irritable colon, ulcerative colitis or other causes of abdominal pain, or blood, mucus or pus in the stool.
  • This test is used to examine the large intestine and the rectum. The patient is given a special contrast material, called barium, into the colon through a tube inserted into the rectum. As the barium passes through the lower intestine, it helps to show an outline of the intestinal wall. In addition to drinking barium, air is often inserted into the bowel for a lower GI X-ray. A special continuous X-ray, called a fluoroscope is often used so that motion within the GI tract can be seen in detail on a video monitor. This test is used to detect polyps, tumors, diverticulitis, gastroenteritis, irritable colon, ulcerative colitis or other causes of abdominal pain, or blood, mucus or pus in the stool.
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): MRI is a diagnostic test that uses a combination of large magnets and radiofrequencies to produce detailed images of organs and structures within the body.
  • This study involves giving the patient small amounts of a liquid containing barium to drink with a bottle, spoon or cup. A series of X-rays is taken to evaluate what happens as the liquid is swallowed.